Post-doc positions available

November 5, 2010 § Leave a comment

Eric Batchelor (Lahav lab) is in the process of setting up his new lab at the NIH and is beginning to look for post-docs.  Eric has been a wonderful part of our community and we’re all sure he’s going to be a great lab head.  Graduate students, take note.

Here’s his ad:

The Batchelor lab is interested in understanding how biological circuits enable cells to process information and make decisions. We focus on stress responses in mammalian cells, with particular interests in the p53 tumor suppressor network and the unfolded protein response. To understand the regulation and the function of these networks, we combine experimental and computational approaches including long-term time-lapse microscopy, chemical and genetic perturbations, and predictive modeling. We aim to not only develop a more quantitative understanding of the proper functioning of stress response networks, but also identify novel strategies to combat diseases in which stress responses are dysregulated, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

The Batchelor lab will be part of the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Cancer Research, located on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, MD, just outside Washington, DC.

Postdoctoral positions are available starting in May 2011. We are interested in candidates with strong backgrounds in molecular biology, cell biology, and/or quantitative sciences, who enjoy working in a collaborative environment and who are enthusiastic about using systems-level analyses to tackle questions in biological signal transduction.

To apply, email a cover letter describing your research interests, a CV, and a list of three references to eric_batchelor@hms.harvard.edu.

Further reading:

Eric Batchelor, Alexander Loewer and Galit Lahav. The ups and downs of p53: understanding protein dynamics in single cells. Nature Reviews Cancer 2009; 9: 371-377

Eric Batchelor, Caroline S. Mock, Irun Bhan, Alexander Loewer and Galit Lahav. Recurrent initiation: a mechanism for triggering p53 pulses in response to DNA damage. Molecular Cell, 2008; 30(3): 277-289.

Eric Batchelor and Mark Goulian. Robustness and the cycle of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in a two-component regulatory system. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2003 100, 691-696.

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